Diabetes Type 1 and 2


Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Finding out you have diabetes is scary. But don't panic. Type 1 diabetes is serious, but people with diabetes can live long, healthy, happy lives.

Conditions & Treatment

Arm yourself with information about conditions associated with type 1 diabetes, and how to prevent them. Conditions associated with type 1 diabetes include hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, ketoacidosis and celiac disease. You will also find helpful information about insulin, choosing blood glucose meters, various diagnostic tests including the A1c test, managing and checking your blood glucose, kidney and islet transplantations, and tips on what to expect from your health care provider.

Complications

Having type 1 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 1 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy). Learn more about these complications and how to cope with them.

Recently Diagnosed

You've just been diagnosed with diabetes. Chances are you have a million questions running through your head. To help you answer those questions, and take the first steps toward better diabetes care, visit the Recently Diagnosed area for people who have just been diagnosed with diabetes, or those needing basic information.

Your Body's Well Being

Make it a priority to take good care of your body. The time you spend now on eye care, foot care and skin care, as well as your heart health and oral health, could delay or prevent the onset of dangerous type 1 diabetes complications later in life. Plus, some of the best things you can do for your body are to stop smoking, and reduce the amount of alcohol you drink.

Common Concerns

This section addresses various areas to help you live with type 1 diabetes. What do you do when you're sick? What do you do when you travel? Can you get a flu shot with diabetes? How do you cope with having type 1 diabetes? Are you being discriminated against because you have diabetes? You'll find answers to these questions, and more in this section. Ask the Pharmacist The American Diabetes Association and Rite Aid "Ask the Pharmacist" area is where you can ask a pharmacist a question to help you manage your diabetes. Rite Aid and the ADA have partnered to allow you to access to Rite Aid's Drug Information Center from our Web site. Women and Diabetes Learn how to ensure your own health and well-being. Health Information For Men Learn how to ensure your own health and well-being

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary for the body to be able to use glucose for energy. When you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body. Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can cause two problems:

  • Right away, your cells may be starved for energy.
  • Over time, high blood glucose levels may hurt your eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart. Finding out you have diabetes is scary. But don't panic.

Type 2 diabetes is serious, but people with diabetes can live long, healthy, happy lives. While diabetes occurs in people of all ages and races, some groups have a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes than others. Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, as well as the aged population.

Conditions & Treatment

Arm yourself with information about conditions associated with type 2 diabetes, and how to prevent them. Conditions associated with type 2 diabetes include hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. You will also find helpful information about insulin, oral medications, various diagnostic tests including the A1c test, managing and checking your blood glucose, and tips on what to expect from your health care provider.

Complications

Having type 2 diabetes increases your risk for many serious complications. Some complications of type 2 diabetes include: heart disease (cardiovascular disease), blindness (retinopathy), nerve damage (neuropathy), and kidney damage (nephropathy). Learn more about these complications and how to cope with them.

Your Body's Well Being

Make it a priority to take good care of your body. The time you spend now on eye care, foot care and skin care, as well as your heart health and oral health, could delay or prevent the onset of dangerous type 2 diabetes complications later in life. Plus, some of the best things you can do for your body are to stop smoking, and reduce the amount of alcohol you drink.

Common Concerns

This section addresses various areas to help you live with type 2 diabetes. What do you do when you're sick? What do you do when you travel? Can you get a flu shot with diabetes? How do you cope with having type 2 diabetes? Are you being discriminated against because you have diabetes? You'll find answers to these questions, and more in this section.